Cannabinoid use in Uveitis; A survey of Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada patients

Thème:
Uvéite
Quoi:
Paper Presentation | Présentation d'article
Partie de:
Quand:
4:05 PM, vendredi 25 juin 2021 (10 minutes)
Discussion:
0

David J. A. Plemel, Mark D. J. Greve.

Disclosure Block: D.J.A. Plemel: None. M.D.J. Greve: Membership on advisory boards or speakers’ bureaus; Name of for-profit or not-for-profit organization(s); Secure Diagnostic Imaging. Membership on advisory boards or speakers’ bureaus; Description of relationship(s); Director. All other investments or relationships that could be seen by a reasonable, well-informed participant as having the potential to influence the content of the educational activity; Name of for-profit or not-for-profit organization(s); Rocky Mountain Collective. All other investments or relationships that could be seen by a reasonable, well-informed participant as having the potential to influence the content of the educational activity; Description of relationship(s); Equity Investment.

Abstract Title:

Cannabinoid use in Uveitis; A survey of Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada patients

Abstract Body:

Purpose: Patients in our clinic have been asking about the evidence for treating chronic uveitis with cannabis products. To the best of our knowledge, there is no evidence to guide such a discussion. This study aims to understand the use of cannabis products as complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) amongst Vogt-Koyanagi-Harada (VKH) patients, as a model of chronic inflammatory eye disease.

Study Design: Survey study. Ethics approval was obtained from the University of Alberta Human Research and Ethics Committee (Pro00098473).

Methods: Patients with VKH were identified from a community retina practice. Patients were called by telephone. Eligible patients who agreed to participate were sent an anonymous online survey regarding their VKH and cannabis use.

Results: Twelve of sixteen (75%) of included patients responded to the survey. Of these, five (5/12; 42%) indicated prior use of cannabis products with the aim of treating their VKH. Three (25%) respondents continue to use cannabis products at least twice weekly for a perceived benefit in VKH management. There are numerous co-morbidities that respondents feel also benefit from the use of cannabis, the most common of which are anxiety and post traumatic stress disorder. Four of five report a preference for high THC products, while smoking is the most preferred method of consumption by three of five.

Conclusions: One quarter of respondents use cannabis products as self-prescribed CAM for VKH. As clinicians, it is important to understand our patients’ prescribed and non-prescription treatments. Basic science and clinical studies will be needed to assess the impact of cannabis products on intraocular inflammation.

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